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Most stories about Donald Trump’s background highlight his father Frederick and his grandfather of the same name who emigrated here at 16 from Germany and made his fortune running restaurants during the Klondike Gold Rush. Less is written about Mary Anne Trump (née, Scottish Gaelic: Màiri Anna NicLeòid) a Gaelic speaker who only later learned English. Mary (pictured) was born 1912, the youngest of ten MacLeod children, in Tong on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, the Outer Hebrides; an area at the time described by historians as a place of “human wretchedness”, its economy and male population decimated in the trenches of World War I and the Highland Clearances or “Eviction of the Gaels” by British landlords enclosing their farms for large scale sheep grazing.           
                                                                 
[Photo: Mary Anne Trump on Scotland’s wild western shore.]
Mary Anne was issued an immigration visa at Glasgow in 1930 and arrived in New York City May 11, one day after her 18th birthday, a “domestic worker”, intent on remaining to apply for U.S. citizenship, which she attained in 1942. Six years after landing here, she met Frederick Trump at a party in Queens. Newsweek wrote that “Fred Trump was a nobody back then, but he soon became one of the biggest home builders in suburban New York.”
So, how much did Mary Anne Trump contribute to Fred’s later success and that of her lookalike offspring, Donald? That’s a task for biographers. But it’s clear that Donald springs from tough stock on both sides.
As I write, the latest mutation of the ongoing Jeremiad to unseat the President of these United States (Great Disruptor of the left’s surefire socialist Novus Ordo Seclorum) is in progress. Cries like those of Ari Emanuel are heard, calling for a complete US shutdown for 18 months or more until a covid-19 vaccine is distributed.
So, “Donald the dummy”, not wanting to be thrown alone into that briar patch, declared himself “the ultimate authority” in charge of reopening states. That challenge infuriated the left, prompting ten Northeast and West Coast governors to announce joint plans to reopen schools and businesses. Trump replied, in effect: OK, the ball’s in your court now. I’ll referee.
In 2016 Democratic consultant Pat Caddell wrote that though the political system is rigged hard against independents, a survey he worked on found that 78% of likely voters believed the two major parties are “too beholden to special and corporate interests to create any meaningful change… By 56% to 32%, voters said that they were so dissatisfied with Democrats and Republicans, they would join a third party if it had a chance of success.”
In 2016 Trump rejected an independent run, throwing his hat and his own money into the Republican ring, taking on 16 other candidates, including 4 who had served as US Senator and 5 as Governor. Most knowledgeable political pundits dismissed his effort as a stunt, but were astounded when he won the nomination. They were then near unanimous in predicting he would lose badly to the anointed heir-apparent, Hillary.
However, as Donald continued to poll credibly, political operatives thought they’d better get an “insurance policy” to protect their bureaucratic empire. America has been put through a lot of strife and anxiety since, and unfortunately no end is yet in sight.
The idea of four estates is am 18th century model of society with clergy considered the first estate, aristocracy the second, peasants and working class the third. Historian Thomas Carlyle described the power of the press as “the fourth estate.” Oscar Wilde later wrote: “…at the present moment it is the only estate… We are dominated by Journalism.” That is truer than ever today with almost all major media outlets controlled by just six conglomerates. They collect information, interpret it, then charge you fees to store it in your brain. They ARE culture. They lean heavily left and are concentrated in big cities. As they devour once respected news and information outlets killed by internet technology, they gain more power to manipulate your consent to govern through your vote.
Leftist media and politicians berate this president for his frequent Tweets.  Before the internet, the press would publish White House statements, sometimes spinning or burying them in the back pages with editorial statements or misleading photos planted alongside. That first became clear to me while compiling news from Ireland for my IrishTV.US show. One New York Times reporter was notorious for completely upending reports on ‘the troubles’, moving important facts to the bottom of the story on the back pages.
Since taking office, the president’s press conferences have been “promethean”. Trump the Titan appears onstage, then press ego-eagles tear his liver for the crime of stealing Democrat fire to benefit deporables.  But the internet is weakening that news control. Now anyone has instant access to a large audience, free of filtration through a hostile medium. That was clearly demonstrated in April 13’s White House Covid-19 press briefing. As the press predators sharpened their claws to attack the narrative, the president interrupted, presenting a video timeline of his actions in the crisis, intercut with reports TV news clips. The president had hoisted a hostile press corps on their own petard. They were stunned. Leftist networks cut the feed. It as a watershed moment, a sign that technology is eroding TV news’ exclusive power over the national narrative. Media moguls can no longer monopolize either “the truth” they manufacture or the audience they catechize.
However, if “the movement” revolution succeeds, that event will be just a bump on the road to a nationwide one-party state. Unchecked, the nation might come to resemble Chicago, a one-party-city since 1946, and Illinois, a one-party state since 1992, where since 1968, 4 of 10 past Illinois governors, Democrats all, have ended up in prison for fraud, bribery, corruption, and extortion.
Mathias ‘Paddy’ Bauler, Chicago alderman elected twice (1933-43; 1947-67) coined the dictum “Chicago ain’t ready for reform yet”, a phrase repeated as humorous; a kind of ghettoish political badge of honor; but also proof of the adage: “absolute power corrupts absolutely”. My hope is to never again see a president tell a union leader on national TV:   “… those jobs are just not gonna come back.”

© 2020 Michael P Morley
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